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Book Pages

Reviews 

Male Perspectives on The Value of Women at Work

This book is a brave, insightful and at times an uncomfortable read in collecting together 30 narratives from men invited, as advocates of women, to articulate their own personal accounts of the value women bring to work and strategies for progress. Curated with a light structure, these individual conversations ebb and flow in a way that gives the reader a rare glimpse across so many voices; it is nuanced and hopeful. The book is not for those that want a top tips list or 4-box matrix model, it instead invites the reader to experience the novelty of a curated research journey. Popoola (2021) defends her single-gendered approach “if we want men to fully understand the challenges women face so they are able to more effectively provide input and support, we need to find ways of including them in the dialogue more”, and she suggests “reading with an open mind”. I have found this book informative in the context of wider reading and it has a place in the spirit of wanting to learn more and I attach below my recent favourite reads on this subject.

(Cont’d)

Lisa Peach, FCIPD, FHEA, Group Head of OD & Leadership. Royal Free London, NHS Foundation Trust

This book is a brave, insightful and at times an uncomfortable read in collecting together 30 narratives from men invited, as advocates of women, to articulate their own personal accounts of the value women bring to work and strategies for progress. Curated with a light structure, these individual conversations ebb and flow in a way that gives the reader a rare glimpse across so many voices; it is nuanced and hopeful. The book is not for those that want a top tips list or 4-box matrix model, it instead invites the reader to experience the novelty of a curated research journey. Popoola (2021) defends her single-gendered approach “if we want men to fully understand the challenges women face so they are able to more effectively provide input and support, we need to find ways of including them in the dialogue more”, and she suggests “reading with an open mind”. I have found this book informative in the context of wider reading and it has a place in the spirit of wanting to learn more and I attach below my recent favourite reads on this subject.

(Cont’d)

Lisa Peach, FCIPD, FHEA, Group Head of OD & Leadership. Royal Free London, NHS Foundation Trust

CONSEQUENCES: DIVERSE TO MOSAIC BRITAIN

This is a very readable book with a great deal of depth. A very serious subject matter is dealt with with a light touch and a deep understanding of what is happening in our contemporary society. It is insightful and sensitive. The humanity of the author shines through. Her analysis is perceptive and thoughtful. It points the way forward. If more people approached the evolution and development of our society with such understanding Britain will become “GREATER BRITAIN” and concerns about what we are becoming will fade away. This book shows a way of looking at changes in a positive way and building a truly “MOSAIC BRITAIN”It should be widely read.Baroness (Usha) Prashar of Runnymede, Former Chair of the Judicial Appointments Commission

TOUCHING THE HEART OF MILTON KEYNES: A SOCIAL PERSPECTIVE

As one of those people actually resident in this area before Milton Keynes was designated, I read this book with extreme interest. Much that has been written about Milton Keynes over the years tends to concentrate too much on the built environment and consequently misses out on the real sense of community that can be found just below the surface. Susan Popoola’s book celebrates all that is good in terms of diversity and achievements, whilst recognising and challenging the problem areas such as inequality and deprivation. The format is very easy to read; with short concise chapters that don’t necessarily need to be taken in the order they are presented. Each chapter opens with a useful quotation, some of which are quite profound. This is a very enjoyable read which I would commend to anybody professing to have an interest in Milton Keynes.

Stephen Clark, Former Milton Keynes Council Councillor

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